Tag Archives: Kate Hannigan

August 06

History’s Beating Heart, in Family Heroes and Superheroes by Kate Hannigan

“She died of the Spanish flu, leaving nine children behind.” “He boarded a boat in Derry after his younger brother joined the Irish Republican Army.” “She was a maid like all the other Irish immigrants. They called them Bridgets.”   For lots of people, history is boring and gray-toned. But for me, it’s always been […]

November 05

Best Books for a Knee-Slapping, Side-Splitting, Spirit-Lifting Belly Laugh by Kate Hannigan

There’s nothing like the joy of snuggling in with a small friend and sharing a picture book. And it’s even better when the book is funny. Not just funny ha-ha, but funny HA-HA! A real knee-slapper. A side-splitter. An I-can’t-talk-right-now-because-I’m-laughing-too-hard kind of book.   They’re tricky to find. But when you do, O, the Hilarity! […]

June 13

Crystal Chan Takes on Complex Issues for Teens in New YA ‘All That I Can Fix’ – Interview by Kate Hannigan

Chicago author Crystal Chan doesn’t shy away from challenging subjects. With her debut novel, the enchanting Bird (Atheneum, 2014), she explored loss, grief, and the meaning of family through the eyes of an inquisitive girl, Jewel. The book resonated with middle-grade readers and adults, and was picked up for translation and publication in nine countries […]

March 02

31 New Picture Book Biographies to Celebrate Women’s History Month by Kate Hannigan

Like any great creation, Women’s History Month traces its roots to the tiniest seed of an idea—or in this case, a single date on the calendar: National Woman’s Day. First observed on February 28, 1909, it was organized by the Socialist Party of America to call for equal rights for women on the job and […]

January 23

How Nellie Bly Introduced Me to My Next Book by Kate Hannigan

Visiting classrooms to talk about researching and writing books, I’m often asked where story ideas come from. I tell students that we can find story ideas everywhere—reading the news, eavesdropping on restaurant conversations, even observing our dogs. I especially love finding them in other books. Such is the case when I was researching a recent […]

June 26

Dana Alison Levy and ‘This Would Make a Good Story Someday’ by Kate Hannigan

What I wouldn’t pay to be a fly on the wall at Dana Alison Levy’s house. Because clearly this author has witnessed some thrilling family dynamics in her day. Nobody does hilariously complicated home life for middle-graders better than Levy, author of The Misadventures of the Family Fletcher (Delacorte Books for Young Readers, 2014), a […]

May 14

Celebrating Nerdom With Mike Merschel’s ‘Revenge of the Star Survivors’ – post by Kate Hannigan

As a nerd, someone married to a nerd, and a mom raising three little nerds, I’ve always felt among my people at Nerdy Book Club. When I had the chance to read Revenge of the Star Survivors (Holiday House, April 2017) by Michael Merschel, I knew this was the perfect place to share it. It’s […]

April 13

Growing Up Amid Unrest in Palestinian Writer Ibtisam Barakat’s ‘Balcony on the Moon’ by Kate Hannigan

One of the most endearing images in Ibtisam Barakat’s beautifully written memoir Balcony on the Moon: Coming of Age in Palestine (Farrar, Straus & Giroux) is when 13-year-old Ibtisam and her little sister, Mona, watch Romanian gymnast Nadia Comaneci win gold medals at the 1976 Olympics.   “On the inside of our closet, Mona and […]

February 09

The Harlem Charade by Natasha Tarpley – Review by Kate Hannigan

“Who gets to decide what is important about a community?” asks debut novelist Natasha Tarpley in her middle-grade mystery The Harlem Charade (January 31, Scholastic). “Who gets to tell our stories?”   Setting her fascinating adventure in Harlem, with its rich history of African American art, music, literature, and dance, Tarpley explores ideas of gentrification […]

June 26

Here Comes the Fun: Sunny Summer Reads by Kate Hannigan

Summertime reading is here. And as I pile up stacks of books to keep my kiddos’ brains from becoming mush, I meet with the inevitable pushback. Titles I point my children toward – the award winners, the weighty “issue” books – are not always the types of stories they want to read. The Washington Post […]