Category Archives: New Book Reviews

May 25

#BlackGirlMagic: Amari and the Night Brothers by B. B. Alston – Review by Alex Harrison

Dr. Rudine Sims Bishop gained more notoriety in the literacy world for her concept of books being windows that offer readers a view of an unfamiliar world, sliding glass doors that are a portal to an untapped imaginative world, or mirrors that reflect personal experiences. With recent book bans across the country, it is important […]

February 16

A Song Below Water by Bethany C. Morrow – Review by Kacy Smith Paterson

A Song Below Water by Bethany C. Morrow Tor Teen, 2020 288 pages, Grades 8 and Up Bethany C. Morrow writes in multiple genres for both adult and young adult audiences She weaves speculative fiction, magical realism, and social justice into her 2020 release, A Song Below Water, a story of black magical teenagers in […]

February 09

The Blue House by Phoebe Wahl – Review by Shilpa Mehta

The Blue House centers around Leo and his father’s beautiful home though not necessarily in a literal sense, yet it is cozy, filled with warmth and love, and a sanctuary for both father and son. Wahl’s illustrations speak volumes, there is much for the young readers to discover on each page that speaks of Leo’s […]

February 02

Snowman-Cold=Puddle: Spring Equations by Laura Purdie Salas – Review by Shilpa Mehta

In this thoughtfully written non-fiction book, Salas takes young readers on a mathematical journey of the world around them, an equation leading the way, followed by an explanatory text. From the nocturnal symphony of frogs to the tap of the woodpecker and the ballet of the kites, Salas adds a fresh dimension to all she […]

January 26

Review of Stella by McCall Hoyle – Review by Millicent Flake

My new granddog Maisy spent the first six months of her life in an animal shelter. When my son and his wife brought her home, she was fearful of everything. She is a sweet girl and wanted to be good but didn’t know exactly what was expected of her. She wasn’t sure where she should […]

January 05

Jubilee: The First Therapy Horse and an Olympic Dream by K T Johnston, illustrated by Anabella Ortiz – Review by Annette Bay Pimentel

What does it mean to have a disability? Sometimes disabilities are obvious to an onlooker—a wheelchair or a white cane signal “disability.” But many disabilities are silent. Kids in a class might never know that their fellow students live with disability. Jubilee: The First Therapy Horse and an Olympic Dream by K T Johnston, illustrated […]

December 08

Giving Thanks for Fry Bread by Trevor Scott Barton

Thanksgiving is my favorite holiday. “Wait, Mr Barton,” said my students. “You mean Christmas isn’t your favorite holiday? That’s when you get presents and stuff!” “Nope,” I said. I like the ‘Thanks’ and the ‘Giving’ parts of Thanksgiving. I like to say ‘thanks’ to all of the people who mean the world to me. And […]

April 27

New Book Review: The Wonder of the World Leaf by Summer Edward, Reviewed by Josh Hem Lee

The children’s picture book The Wonder of the World Leaf  is written by Summer Edward with illustrations by Sayada Ramdial. In the book, we follow the quest of Wygenia, a young girl who lives on the island of Trinidad. When her beloved Grannie falls ill, Wygenia determines to find a seemingly magical leaf called Wonder […]

January 04

Legacy: Women Poets of the Harlem Renaissance by Nikki Grimes – The Beginning of an Era – Review by Maggie Bokelman

I don’t recall any year as eagerly anticipated as 2021. But how to celebrate?  Parties are out—at least, the usual sort.  And while virtual gatherings have their merits, we’re all a bit tired of screens. This might be the perfect year to ring in with poetry:  poetry that connects and inspires us; poetry that pays […]

August 24

THE ASSIGNMENT by Liza Wiemer: MAKE HISTORY – SPEAK UP! – Book Review by Aliza Werner

The lie about history is that it remains in the past.   History is persistent and if left unattended, or in untrustworthy hands, it has the potential to breathe new life into its darkest, deadliest disasters. History is a shapeshifter. It hopes you do not recognize a wolf in sheep’s clothing, or war disguised as […]