Category Archives: Uncategorized

george November 10

Please Listen To Alex Gino Talk About George

This past June, at the American Library Association’s Annual Conference, I had the opportunity to talk to Alex Gino about their book George. If you haven’t had a chance to listen to the episode, please check it out. I pray that the episode gives you hope. Colby Sharp is a third grade teacher in Parma, Michigan. […]

andrea-spooner11 November 09

Something Old, Something New; Something Borrowed, Something True: Refreshing a Classic by Andrea Spooner

I’ve had the pleasure of working on many folktale and fairy tale retellings in my nearly twenty-five year career, and some of the most rewarding experiences have been working on Jerry Pinkney’s tales The Lion & The Mouse (the 2010 Randolph Caldecott Medal) and his upcoming The Three Billy Goats Gruff (coming May 2017), as […]

Hi Res Yarn Logo March 13

Okay For Everyone by Shelley Johannes

Most of my personal epiphanies have come while reading fiction—while I’m fully immersed in a book with my guard down. This past Sunday was a first for me though. In just ten minutes and sixteen seconds, before I was even fully awake, a podcast leveled me. I was in prime position to be unraveled by […]

Brian's Winter March 12

Top Ten Short Novels to Snuggle Up With During a Blizzard by Stephanie House

“Whether the weather is cold, or whether the weather is hot, we’ll weather the weather whatever the weather, whether we like it or not.” Thus went the tongue twister we chanted in theatre camp. Recently, New York City, DC, and the surrounding areas got a crash course in just that. Most people snuggled up to […]

2015 John Newbery Committee
(Photo credit: Corey Capps) January 22

Crossing Over into a Community of Readers (Part Two) by Eti Berland

  Standing in the exhibit hall in Chicago after two days of intense book deliberations examining and discussing children’s books with the fourteen other dedicated and brilliant members of my committee, I feel like a glittering orb of joy. My mind feels new, rewired by this labor of love that pushed me beyond my believed […]

The Students with Eti January 21

A Friendship Born of the Newbery (Part One) by Leanne Statland Ellis

With the glow of ALA award announcements still shining on our faces, it’s time for a story, dear readers, a story about books and basketball, about children and reading, and most importantly, a story of how one special Newbery book brought about an equally special friendship.   I structure the reading program in my fourth […]

Hi Res Yarn Logo December 20

If you liked reading…you may like listening to… by Travis Jonker and Colby Sharp

Technology has helped humanity in many ways. It’s helped cure disease. It’s reinvented communication. It has made the impossible possible. Case in point: I now enjoy doing the dishes. I owe this particular (admittedly, minor) miracle to podcasts, which I listen to while scrubbing away. Podcasts are radio shows you can listen to online or […]

wp-1448625144139.png November 27

A DELUGE of WATER BOOKS by Nancy Bo Flood

Water moves.  Water changes shape and form.  Simple ideas but the enormous importance of the water cycle is hard to appreciate, as is the enormous importance of water.  Water is life.  You are water, at least two-thirds of you, even your bones and your brain! I share with you a deluge of wonderful water books.  […]

wp-1448544332265.jpg November 26

First Term at Malory Towers by Enid Blyton – Book Review by Mahriya Zahid

Memories of thrilling adventures, mischievous plots, shocking secrets and new friendships still excite me to this day. The stories of Darrell Rivers and her friends at their new school, Malory Towers, delight me and the unexpected twists along the way make the journey even more captivating.  Enid Blyton had simply created a masterpiece that made […]

wpid-wp-1448363454947.jpg November 25

Seven Important Things About The Seventh Most Important Thing for Seventh Grade Readers by Amy Estersohn

There’s been a lot of talk among writers about writing books for readers ages 11-14 who are no longer interested in most middle grades literature and who are too young for most young adult titles. Shelley Pearsall’s a self-described writer of middle school lit, and her new book, The Seventh Most Important Thing, is bound […]